Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Pirates trade McCutchen to Giants | theScore.com



As called....
https://slavieboy.blogspot.com/2018/01/giants-seek-andrew-mccutchen-outfield.html

from thescore.com
Pirates trade McCutchen to Giants | theScore.com:

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I know that many will say the 'Cutch to move to a corner OF spot, but he deserves the right to remind SF of the GOAT, Willie Mays in CF.

Crick is a great turnaround project for Ray Searage. Reynolds is a couple of years away and behind Duggar for future CF. I cannot believe that they could have also had Jay Bruce for 3 yrs. / $39M and low-balled him at a reported $29M for same three years. If they feel they have enough bats now, they go for a low-priced CF like Dyson, or Billy Hamilton, whose price just went down. Carlos Gonzalez could still be in the picture if you're sure about 'Cutch in CF for a full season.

I like  the lineup as is and I think Shaw could be the OF bat as soon as 2018.

So far, Arroyo, Reynolds and Crick leveraged into Longoria and McCutchen. Two faces of the franchise, great leadership kind of guys. I like the composition of the team now and for the immediate future. The lineup tilts a bit heavy to the 30+ crowd, but for now, I'm OK with it.

Tony Boselli puts Chris Simms on blast for being awful at football

Tony Boselli puts Chris Simms on blast for being awful at football
Image result for chris simms


The Jaguars are going to the Championship game with the #70 ranked QB, according to both Chris Simms, who should be ashamed of himself, and that chortling, ESPN-moron, Dan LeBeRetard, who is a perma-fool. 

Simms is worse than an idiot. I still hope Boselli punches him in the face, it might raise his IQ.

After what his Dad went through in NY with ignorant fans and media, Chris Simms should know better. Phil Simms was known as Simms Sucks right up until the first Super Bowl, from which he emerged as the MVP. 

The New York Post had letters from fans in the week leading up to that first Super Bowl saying "It's nice that the Giants got this far, but Simms will blow it." The Broncos logo, John Elway was destined to roll over the vaunted Giants D and win easily. Didn't happen. The quotes below, attributed to the junior Simms, are of the same tone and tenor as those leveled at the senior Simms back in the day. 

For that, I would excuse Phil Simms from the charge of child abuse if he beat Boselli to the punch, both literally and figuratively. 

Fan-boys, media pseudo-experts and amateur pseudo-analysts were stupid back then and they remain stupid today. 

Chris Simms is a horses ass. He's still the same guy that rode up to the University of Texas in a limo and lost the team to the unheralded Major Applewhite. Stupid then, stupid now.

from blackandteal.com
https://blackandteal.com/2018/01/10/tony-boselli-puts-chris-simms-blast-awful-elevator-quarterbacks/

Tony Boselli puts Chris Simms on blast for being awful at evaluating quarterbacks





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Monday, January 08, 2018

2018 CBD Season Preview and Predictions: Atlantic Sun – College Baseball Daily

College Baseball Daily

Since I am now attending the University of North Florida, let's do some analysis on the 2018 baseball squad. I agree with the analysis here that pitching needs to be, and should be better than last year.

from College Baseball Daily:
2018 CBD Season Preview and Predictions: Atlantic Sun – College Baseball Daily:
North Florida (2017 Record: 33-24, 12-9)
North Florida had a very solid 2017 season finishing with the fourth best record in the conference. But they went two-and-out in the Atlantic Sun Tournament and saw their season cut short.
Lineup:
They lose five of their top six hitters from 2017. Chris Berry is the lone person among those six to return. The second baseman hit .310 with 21 runs scored, 6 doubles, 3 home runs and 32 RBI. Outfielder Wesley Weeks hit .267 last year with 28 runs scored, 10 doubles, 2 home runs, 21 RBI and 11 stolen bases. Catcher Blake Voyles and infielder Mac Wilson are expected to take on bigger roles in 2018.

Pitching:
This team does return its best starting pitcher from last year in Frank German. He posted a 2.43 ERA in 81.1 innings pitched last year with 76 strikeouts. Austin Drury also comes back after posting a 3.03 ERA in 74.1 innings pitched with 61 strikeouts. Cooper Bradford could join the weekend rotation as well after having a 2.79 ERA in 51.2 innings pitched (9 starts) last year with 53 strikeouts. Brad Depperman could get another shot in the rotation after starting eight games last year with a 5.57 ERA in 53.1 innings pitched with 42 strikeouts.

2018 Outlook:
Even though this team loses a lot of production from the lineup, they could have one of the best starting pitching rotations in the conference. They’ll need to add some depth in the bullpen to fill out the pitching staff, but if they find some offense this team could be good again in 2018.
--

The key is how well Depperman adapts to starting. His stats indicate he knows his way around the strike zone, with a K/BB of 5.25. However, he also leads in H/9 among the potential starters at 12.20. If he misses more bats or pitches to weaker contact, he could elevate quickly.

The offense really has to clip coupons to score runs, however they did outscore their opponents 341-245 last year. Their winning percentage last year (.579) outperformed their expected winning percentage per Pythagoreum formula (.516) which indicates that last years squad was a team that was pretty good fundamentally, a "King of Little Things" type of squad that I like to watch.

You can go a long way playing that type of baseball.

There are some pretty good prospects coming through on the opposition side of the schedule, so I hope to be able to see quite a few games this year.

I wonder which is greater, my 55+ plus or my student discount.

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Friday, January 05, 2018

Giants 2018 Prospects: Hitters Edition

to 

Last week I posted my analysis of the Giants pitching prospects as I view them today.   https://slavieboy.blogspot.com/2017/12/giants-2018-prospects-pitchers-edition.html

Today, we'll look at the hitting prospects.

Currently, LF looks like SOSDD. If it's not Jarrett Parker v. Mac Williamson 2.0 (Yuck), the best hitting prospect I see is Heath Quinn and I'm not sure he would rise to perhaps the Andrew Susac level as a hitter. Not bad, but not enough. The light should have gone on for Parker and Williamson for that matter. It hasn't.

Of the two CF prospects, I like Duggar's approach over Brian Reynolds. The power potential for Reynolds, is not quite like Parker/Williamson, etc. but one of them has to take command of the position soon.

Aramis Garcia looks the part of a solid backup catcher, but I thought he would hit better than he has to date. He is 25+, so you have to see what you have there, or he moves from prospect to suspect.

On the infield, I like C.J. Hinojosa's hitting approach better than his overall results, which means utility IF at best. The same for Kelvin Beltre at 3B, and it's even harder to be a utility IF at 3B. Jacob Gonzalez flashes the same signals as Beltre, with a smaller sample size. It is good to see a young HS hitter display an advanced, patient approach.

I saved the best for last.

Chris Shaw has a chance to be an elite power hitter. Not quite an advanced hitting approach like Brandon Belt and not quite the same production as Adam Duvall, but maybe a crazy, lower case cross between Belt and Duvall, if that makes any sense. He's a keeper. DO NOT TRADE!!

Heliot Ramos has as good a chance of being the 5-tool type super-star player the Giants have been looking for out of their farm system for many, many years. Also a keeper. DO NOT TRADE!!

It seems as if either Duggar or Reynolds could be included as filler in a trade with Beede / Stratton for either McCutchen or Billy Hamilton. If that's the case, I'd prefer they kept Duggar, but not so much that I would walk away from McCutchen.

It seems like the Giants are leaning towards adding a FA and trading for a piece. DON'T lose the 2nd round pick in this years draft, it appears to be loaded with pitching. Plan A is trade for McCutchen and sign Jay Bruce. Plan B is sign CarGo and trade for Billy Hamilton. See the drop-off? One is a Plan to Contend, the other is a Roadmap to Oblivion.

Anyway, to review the hitter:

+ Propsects:  ChriShaw, Steven Duggar, Heath Quinn and Heliot Ramos 
                      
?? Prospects:  AramiGarcia, C.J. Hinojosa , Brian Reynolds, Kelvin Beltre and Jacob                                         Gonzalez 

I don't have any negative prospects here since none of these guys really came with great expectations. WYSIWYG's


Thursday, January 04, 2018

Giants seek Andrew McCutchen, outfield help | San Francisco Giants

Image result for andrew mccutcheon




This is the best fit for the Giants, short and long term, IMO. I liked him over Giancarlo.



Now, as far as the price goes: Shaw = NO, Ramos = HELL NO!! and Beede is what he is, which is Stratton. We already have Stratton, so Beede is a YES!! 


The Giants would regret trading Ramos or Shaw for a long time.  


You only get one of the top three, that "at least" garbage can walk out the door. Move on to Bruce.  


One from column A and one from column B for 'Cutch.



Giants seek Andrew McCutchen, outfield help | San Francisco Giants:



Meanwhile, the Giants are reluctant to part with top prospects for McCutchen, after giving up highly regarded infielder Christian Arroyo in last month's trade with the Rays for Evan Longoria.
Outfielder/first baseman Chris Shaw, right-hander Tyler Beede and outfielder Heliot Ramos are the Giants' top three prospects, per MLB Pipeline. One source said the Pirates are asking for at least one of those three in any McCutchen trade with San Francisco.


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Friday, December 29, 2017

Is The ‘Old School’ Method of Teaching Hitting Outdated?



Hi Charles

Rachel Garcia Swing Test Experiment
Recently, Rachel Garcia, an elite collegiate softball player (National Freshman of the year at UCLA) went through a simple before and after hitting analysis that I took a small part of and thought it might help to answer our question about 'Old School' teaching methods. 

Rachel added 11 MPH in Tee Exit Velocity (Tee measures 'Raw' Power - no pitch influences), from 68 MPH to 79 MPH and increased her average Launch Angle from 5.4 degrees to 9.8 degrees in one 30 minute session.  In fact, her average Exit Velocity in her 'after' round was 5 MPH higher than her top speed in the first round.  The two most important metrics in hitting, Exit Velocity and Launch Angle, both increased significantly and immediately.  An elite athlete, seemingly already firing on all cylinders, adding 14% to her Exit Velocity.  How is this possible?  

Elite performance and 'swing efficiency' are not the same things and it is possible to hit very well with slight swing inefficiencies.  We tend to look at elite players and just assume the reason they are elite is that their swing movements are perfect.  While she already had a good swing, there were some key mechanical movements that could become more efficient and thus the immediate increase. 
​​​​​​​


Tomorrow look for a year end special on the Hitting Is A Guess - Time Training and all hitting  programs combined............. 
GuessWorks, 41303 27th Street West, Palmdale, CA 93551, USA

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Listen to Angela Duckworth on Grit in Podcasts




Listen to Angela Duckworth on Grit from EconTalk in Podcasts. https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/econtalk/id135066958?mt=2&i=1000373059701

How important is grit relative to talent? Can grit be taught? Angela Duckworth of the University of Pennsylvania and author of Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance talks with with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the nature of success in work, play and life. How much does grit matter? Is grit malleable or something we're born with? Duckworth discusses her research on these questions and how to think about what it means for a child and an adult to thrive.


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WHY we coach | Coach Cano, ONEighty Athletics





Coach Slavik

I just read this article from Jeff Janssen Sports Leadership Center on WHY we coach and had to share it with my fellow coaches.
why we coach:

I COACH YOU because I care about you.

I CHALLENGE YOU because I believe in you.

I EXPECT YOUR COMMITMENT because I know your family and job will.


I HOLD YOU ACCOUNTABLE because life will hold you accountable.


I PUSH YOU OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE because it's the only place where real growth occurs.


I WANT YOU TO DO IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME because life doesn't always give second chances.


I ASK YOU TO SACRIFICE FOR THE TEAM because true success means being a part of something far greater than yourself.


I IMPLORE YOU TO GIVE YOUR BEST because I don't want you to look back on this season, your career, or life with regrets.


I DEVELOP YOU TO LEAD because your company, community, and country will eventually need you to.


I DISCIPLINE YOU because I want you to learn there's a right way and wrong way to do things and treat people.


I CHALLENGE YOU TO COMPETE because you'll fight some battles in your life where losing is just not an option.


I INSIST YOU PAY ATTENTION TO DETAIL because you'll soon realize that the little things are the BIG things.


I PUT YOU THROUGH ADVERSITY because you'll need the persistence to overcome far greater adversities in your life.


I MAKE YOU EARN A SPOT because you'll take more pride in and ownership of the things you work hard for and earn.


I INSIST YOU DO THE RIGHT THING because I want you to look in the mirror and be proud of who you are and what you stand for.


I REQUIRE YOU TO REPRESENT YOURSELF WITH CLASS because you'll carry your reputation with you for the rest of your life.


I FORCE YOU TO FACE YOUR FEARS because breaking through your fears gives you the confidence to take on any challenge life throws at you.


I DO EVERYTHING I DO because I want you to become the absolute best version of yourself and develop into the responsible and respected adult your family, friends, coworkers, community, and the world all need you to be.


THIS IS WHY

I thought this was a perfect message to start off a great week!

Coach Cano
Win The Kids!

The offseason is here! If you haven't joined the other 1000's of coaches in our Elite Sports Performance Program click the link below and check it out.

Sent to: Theslav1959@yahoo.com

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Dominican Walk Rates over Time - Plate Discipline



by Matt Klaassen - October 30, 2012


Excellent article from both Fan Graphs and Baseball Prospectus that demonstrate how the old stereotypes about Latin American hitters may be shifting right before our eyes. 
HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE ARTICLES:
 While raw skills will always be coveted, it's the players who can translate skills into statistical production—the definition of which seems to change every day—who are considered stars. 
In the short term, this deficiency is causing teams to waste valuable developmental time in trying to teach on-base skills and plate discipline to kids who have no concept of what that means or who have grown up believing that watching a pitch pass by is a sin. And in the end, it might be a fruitless cause anyway. 

 The simplest explanation for this endemic lack of discipline is that Dominican kids rarely play games. Socioeconomic conditions have made sports a low government priority in the poverty-stricken country. By the time players are 17, the AL international scouting director estimates, Dominican players are at least 1,000 at-bats behind their American counterparts. 
"There's not a lot of little league baseball," said Brian Mejia, co-founder of the Dominican Prospect League. "There is a lack of structure for organized baseball at that level. Some kids only learn 'see ball, hit ball.' Free swingers are out there because if they don't have a lot of athleticism, they believe that 'I have to hit.' A lot of it is too because so many of those kids suffer from malnutrition that they have to start their swing so early [because they lack the strength to catch up quickly to fastballs]. They are trying to adapt but getting rid of bad habits is difficult."

It's not that Dominicans are less culturally inclined to be patient—a notion so stereotypically ignorant that it's hardly worth mentioning—it's that they simply haven't had the experiences that would teach them to play that way.


The differences in walk rate are more pronounced in the minors, though the gaps don't grow at the lower levels—we see the biggest separation at Triple-A, at least this season.
Something else it's important to note: some players in the "Dominican" group were born in the Dominican Republic but played in the United States as amateurs and were drafted, not signed as international free agents. These players—including Albert Pujols and Jose Bautista—didn't receive the same sort of swing-happy instruction Jorge wrote about, so we checked to make sure that they weren't skewing the results. Take those players out, and we see some slight changes in the Dominican-born (and Dominican-raised) group at the major-league level: swing rate rises from 47.4 percent to 47.8 percent, O_Swing rate rises from 31.3 percent to 31.7 percent, and walk rate falls from 7.0 percent to 6.8 percent.

As expected, the Dominican-born, U.S.-raised players in the sample weren't saddled with the same impatient approach.

---




by Matt Klaassen - October 30, 2012

Last week, Jorge Arangure wrote a nice piece on the lack of plate patience among Dominican hitters. The article was helpful in illustrating the conditions that reinforce the oft-cited Dominican baseball adage that "you can't walk off of the island." It also inspired me to take a little look at the historical numbers among Dominican-born players to see if there's been any change in walk rates over the years.

Ben Lindbergh wrote a helpful companion piece running some plate-discipline-related numbers for Dominican players in 2012. What I wanted to examine, though, was if anything changed over the years, and to speculate what might have caused the change.

In comparing the walk rates of Dominican major-league hitters relative to everyone else, I ran into one obvious problem: the initial sample was incredibly small. Back in 1956, Dominican-born hitters had 12 plate appearances in the major leagues, all from the Giants' Ozzie Virgil, Sr., the first Dominican to play in the majors (incidentally, in 1958, he was traded to Detroit and broke the color barrier for the Tigers). Virgil also was the full sample (241 plate appearances) of Dominican hitters in 1957. In 1958, there were two Dominican-born hitters in the majors, but in 1959, it was one again. In 1960, there were four Dominican hitters in the league.

Without going year-by-year, you get the idea: early on, the samples were very small. I try not to give the illusion that I am terribly sophisticated statistically, so, somewhat arbitrarily, I  began with 1964. That's the first season in which at least 10 Dominican-born hitters (I excluded pitchers' hitting from this study) got plate appearances in the major leagues. Still, even 10 players is a very small sample. That was about 2.7% of all major league plate appearances by non-pitchers in 1964 — up from about 1.5% the previous season. We have to start somewhere, though. There has been a general increase in numbers of Dominican-born players and plate appearances by them since then.

While a numbers of things make up a good plate approach, for the sake of simplicity and sticking with the overall tenor of discussions around this issue, I restricted the survey to walk rate. Here is a graph of the walk rates of Dominican-born hitters since 1964, compared to non-Dominican-born hitters:

While both lines have fluctuations, the overall trend is pretty clear: the walk rate for Dominican-born hitters has been catching up to that of non-Dominicans. Comparing the walk rates of 1964 and 2012, the non-Dominican walk rate is almost the same; it has increased by 0.6%. The walk rate of Dominican-born hitters, in contrast, is about 48% higher in 2012 than in 1964.

By itself, of course, this does not tell us much. Many things have changed since Ozzie Virgil's debut. The number of Dominicans in the majors leagues and major-league presence there and elsewhere internationally is obviously far greater now than it was 50 years ago. In 1964, only 10 non-pitcher Dominicans got major-league plate appearances. By the early '00s, the seasonal number is more than 50 — usually around 10% of plate appearances by non-pitchers. That in itself is enough to indicate great changes that would have far-reaching effects. Which of those are most germane with respect to walk rates. That is something for a future piece. There are a number of factors that would have to be considered. Here is a short list of possible considerations. It is not meant to be exhaustive, nor are these possibilities mutually exclusive.

*Qualification: This search is based on the easily-available criterion of birthplace, so the grouping is done by whether a player is born in the Dominican Republic. However, the issue of Arangure's piece is Dominican youth baseball culture, not birthplace. That is not to say that birthplace is not a decent stand-in for a quick query like this, but it's simply to note that there is a difference. Players such as Manny Ramirez and Jose Bautista were born in the Dominican but, in Ramirez's case, he grew up in the United States.; in Bautista's case, he went to college in the U.S. They did not have a traditional route for Dominican players. I don't think it makes the graph useless, but it's worth noting that it might skew things given the issue of Arangure's piece was early baseball instruction in the Dominican Republic. One cause of the increase on the chart might be that more Domican-born players are being raised in the U.S.

*One obvious hypothesis for the improvement might be that Dominican baseball instruction is more friendly to walks than before. This might be the case, although the tone of Arangure's piece tends to make it seem otherwise. Morever, there are other possibilities.

*Remember that this survey is just of those Dominican-born players who actually make the majors. Increased major-league attention to Latin America in the past half-century has likely enabled them to scout and select Dominican players with better plate approaches.

*Along the same lines, there might be better minor-league instruction generally, and/or for Dominican players specifically.

To repeat, these are just some suggestions that are neither exhaustive nor exclusive. One thing is clear, though: whatever they were taught as youngsters, those Dominican hitters who make the major leagues have been catching up with the rest of the league in their ability to draw walks. The reasons why are matters for further research.

Finding a Way to Walk off the Island

Most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.
Jorge Arangure has been a baseball writer since 2003. He has worked as a senior writer for ESPN and The Washington Post. He's got #want and is #wet and will probably spend his BP freelancing money drinking with Jason Parks.
Two years ago, during a lull in an often sloppily played Dominican Prospect League game being contested at a team academy on the outskirts of San Pedro de Macoris, an independent trainer conspicuously called to a player in the batter's box in the middle of an at-bat. After a pitch had thudded into the catcher's glove, the boy, aged 15 and frail, turned quickly and stepped out of the batter's box. 
"Stop looking at pitches," the trainer said angrily. "Swing the bat."
The boy nodded and continued his at-bat, which concluded with a groundout to shortstop. 
Games of this sort, played by unsigned prospects, have become commonplace in a country that is trying to narrow a learning gap that has become exposed as the game continues to shift toward more nuanced baseball skills. While raw skills will always be coveted, it's the players who can translate skills into statistical production—the definition of which seems to change every day—who are considered stars. 
These games, and to an extent Dominican Summer League games, are fascinating character studies. Since no fans are allowed into the academies, the majority of observers are either coaches, scouts or trainers, which creates a highly pressurized environment for kids aged anywhere from 14-17. Prospects can hear every word shouted to them, and all of these instructions hold special resonance since they are uttered by men who control their young futures. 
Kids will listen to what these men say, and follow their instruction. Unfortunately, much of what these young players are hearing—like the trainer chastising his prodigy for being selective—is steering them astray. 
It's been more than a decade since the value of on-base percentage reached the mainstream, yet the significance of that has yet to hit the island. While the industry has evolved to evaluate players based on advanced metrics that capture the impact of previously overlooked contributions, scouting and teaching in the Dominican continues to be based on raw skills grounded in flawed fundamentals. 
Put simply, among other things, Dominican players don't walk. Some stunning number to consider: out of the top 10 leaders in walks last year in each of the 10 full-season minor leagues, only four of the possible 100 players were Dominican. Only two undrafted, non-U.S.-educated, Dominican-born players rank in the top 40 in baseball in walk rate since 2009: David Ortiz, and Cleveland's Carlos Santana
In the short term, this deficiency is causing teams to waste valuable developmental time in trying to teach on-base skills and plate discipline to kids who have no concept of what that means or who have grown up believing that watching a pitch pass by is a sin. And in the end, it might be a fruitless cause anyway. 
"I think you can help a kid, but I don't think you can change a kid from what he is," said one American League international scouting director. "You're not turning someone like Vladdy (Vladimir Guerrero) into a disciplined hitter." 
Mark Newman, a Yankees senior vice president, believes that with hard work—usually during periods such as the instructional league, which will take place for most organizations in the next month or so—a team could significantly improve the walk rate of approximately 10-15 percent of players, a number that hardly seems encouraging. In that example, only one out of 10 offensive players signed out of the Dominican will ever acquire the secondary skills that would make him a very valuable hitter in the majors.
Dominican youngsters are trading potentially lucrative long-term contracts as professionals for the quick profit they can turn by exhibiting skills that will get them a signing bonus as amateurs. Only one of the 30 biggest contracts ever handed out was given to a Dominican-born, amateur free agent player: Alfonso Soriano. And the biggest reason why the Soriano contract has turned into such a disaster for the Cubs? While Soriano can hit (he has 372 career home runs), he can't walk (a lowly .323 career OBP and 7.2 percent walk rate). 
The simplest explanation for this endemic lack of discipline is that Dominican kids rarely play games. Socioeconomic conditions have made sports a low government priority in the poverty-stricken country. By the time players are 17, the AL international scouting director estimates, Dominican players are at least 1,000 at-bats behind their American counterparts. 
"There's not a lot of little league baseball," said Brian Mejia, co-founder of the Dominican Prospect League. "There is a lack of structure for organized baseball at that level. Some kids only learn 'see ball, hit ball.' Free swingers are out there because if they don't have a lot of athleticism, they believe that 'I have to hit.' A lot of it is too because so many of those kids suffer from malnutrition that they have to start their swing so early [because they lack the strength to catch up quickly to fastballs]. They are trying to adapt but getting rid of bad habits is difficult."
Mejia estimates that about 60 percent of prospects in the DPL are playing organized baseball for the first time. Players who don't play baseball as children usually lack a basic understanding of baseball's more mental skills: baserunning, plate discipline, etc. 
It's not that Dominicans are less culturally inclined to be patient—a notion so stereotypically ignorant that it's hardly worth mentioning—it's that they simply haven't had the experiences that would teach them to play that way. 
But with amateur signing bonuses now being capped by baseball's new rules regarding international free agents, there is no better time to shift thinking toward more advanced methods of instruction.
If they don't adapt, Dominican players face a future in which an industry de-values them and limits the length of their careers as they climb up baseball's organizational ladder. The older these players get, and the more they lose their raw athletic skills (bat speed, running speed, hand speed, etc), the easier it will be for them to be replaced by the next crop of young, fundamentally flawed Dominicans. 
***



Dominican Players and Plate Discipline: Additional Data

If you read Jorge Arangure Jr.'s great guest piece on Dominican players and plate discipline today, you may have wondered, as I did, whether we could see any difference between Dominicans and non-Dominicans in the data. Jorge mentioned how few Dominicans are among their respective leagues' leaders in walk rate, but I wanted to see how DR-born players stacked up as a group. I asked BP data dude Dan Turkenkopf to run the numbers, and this is what he found for major leaguers in 2012. (Note: pitcher hitting is included, and the "league" rates include Dominican players.)
Swing Rate
O_Swing_Rate
UIBB Rate
League
695953
46.0
29.2
7.4
Dominican
68823
47.4
31.3
7.0
Major leaguers born in the Dominican Republic did swing and chase slightly more often and walk slightly less often in 2012 (which doesn't mean they were worse hitters overall). Of course, there could be some selection bias here, since Dominican players with worse plate discipline than Angel Berroa would be weeded out before they make the majors. We don't have plate discipline stats for minor leaguers, but we can check their unintentional walk rates:
Level
LG_PA
LG_UIBBR
DO_PA
DO_UIBBR
MLB
184179
7.4%
18547
7.0%
0.4%
Triple-A
164927
8.4%
12369
5.8%
2.6%
Double-A
158288
8.6%
14860
6.5%
2.1%
A Adv. (Full Season)
156140
8.2%
15508
6.4%
1.9%
A (Full Season)
158317
8.6%
18018
7.0%
1.6%
A (Short Season)
63737
8.6%
9606
6.4%
2.2%
Rookie
79243
8.6%
12741
7.1%
1.4%
The differences in walk rate are more pronounced in the minors, though the gaps don't grow at the lower levels—we see the biggest separation at Triple-A, at least this season.
Something else it's important to note: some players in the "Dominican" group were born in the Dominican Republic but played in the United States as amateurs and were drafted, not signed as international free agents. These players—including Albert Pujols and Jose Bautista—didn't receive the same sort of swing-happy instruction Jorge wrote about, so we checked to make sure that they weren't skewing the results. Take those players out, and we see some slight changes in the Dominican-born (and Dominican-raised) group at the major-league level: swing rate rises from 47.4 percent to 47.8 percent, O_Swing rate rises from 31.3 percent to 31.7 percent, and walk rate falls from 7.0 percent to 6.8 percent.

As expected, the Dominican-born, U.S.-raised players in the sample weren't saddled with the same impatient approach.

Giants Top Minor League Prospects

  • 1. Tyler Beede 6-4, 215 RHP from Vanderbilt projects as top of the rotation starter when he works out his command/control issues. When he misses, he misses by a bunch.
  • 2. Chris Shaw 6-3. 230 1B Lefty power bat, limited defensively to 1B, Matt Adams comp?
  • 3. Bryan Reynolds 6-2, 210 OF Switch hitter with average speed and polished hitting approach. Fits Giants mold of high-floor, low-ceiling prospects.
  • 4. Stephen Duggar 6-1, 170 CF Another toolsy, under-achieving OF in the Gary Brown mold, hoping for better results.
  • 5. Sandro Fabian 6-0, 180 OF Dominican signee from 2014, shows some pop in his bat. Below average arm and lack of speed should push him towards LF.
  • 6. Aramis Garcia 6-2, 220 C from Florida INTL projects as a good bat behind the dish with enough defensive skill to play there long-term
  • 7. Heliot Ramos 6-2, 185 OF Potential high-ceiling player the Giants have been looking for. Great bat speed, early returns were impressive.
  • 8. Garrett Williams 6-1, 205 LHP Former Oklahoma standout, Giants prototype, low-ceiling, high-floor prospect.
  • 9. Heath Quinn 6-2, 190 OF Strong hitter, makes contact with improving approach at the plate. Returns from hamate bone injury.
  • 10. Seth Corry 6-2 195 LHP Highly regard HS pick. Was mentioned as possible chip in high profile trades.
  • 11. Jacob Gonzalez 6-3, 190 3B Good pedigree, impressive bat for HS prospect.
  • 12. C.J. Hinojosa 5-10, 175 SS Scrappy IF prospect in the mold of Kelby Tomlinson, just gets it done.
  • 13. Shaun Anderson 6-4, 225 RHP Large frame, 3.36 K/BB rate. Can start or relieve
  • 14. Garett Cave 6-4, 200 RHP He misses a lot of bats and at times, the plate. 13 K/9 an 5 B/9. Wild thing.

2018 MLB Draft - Top National HS Players

  • 1. Ethan Hankins 6-6, 215 RHP Forsyth Central HS (GA) Mi 90's FB tops at 96-98, plus breaking ball. Vanderbilt commit.
  • 2. Kumar Rocker 6-5, 250 RHP North Oconee HS (GA) Heavy 98 FB, sharp mid 90's slider. Vanderbilt commit.
  • 3. Matthew Liberatore 6-5, 200 LHP Mountain Ridge HS (AZ) High 3/4 arm slot, 91-93 FB tops at 95, with good feel for pitching. Arizona commit.
  • 4. Slade Cecconi 6-4, 195 RHP Trinity Prep HS (FL) High 90's FB tops at 97, with mid 80's breaking ball. Miami commit.
  • 5. Carter Stewart 6-6, 200 RHP Eau Galle HS (FL) Highest spin rate breaking ball in draft. Mississippi State commit.
  • 6. Luke Bartnicki 6-3, 210 LHP Walton HS (GA) Low 90's FB with command, workable slider. Georgia Tech commit.

2018 Top MLB College Draft Prospects

  • 1. Brady Singer 6-5, 200 RHP Florida Sergio Romo-esque slider from whippy low 3/4 arm slot. Mid 90's FB, sharp slider and change-up. 3.4 K/BB rate.
  • 2. Casey Mize 6-3, 210 RHP Auburn Forearm issues, 96 FB with split/slider mix, 6.2 K/BB ratio.
  • 3. Logan Gilbert 6-6, 205 RHP Stetson Loose arm action, 3 pitch mix, 93-96 FB 3.2 K/BB.
  • 4. Ryan Rollison 6-3, 200 LHP Mississippi Smooth delivery from 3/4 arm slot, 89-93 FB tops at 94/95. Late 1st, early 2nd rounder. 2.8 K/BB rate.
  • 5. Shane McClanahan 6-1, 175 LHP South Florida Thin build, 3/4 arm slot, tall and fall delivery. 93/96 FB range. 3.0 K/BB rate.

2018 Top MLB HS Draft Prospects in Tampa Bay Area

  • 1. Connor Scott 6-4, 180 OF Plant HS (FL) Florida commit.